Buzz IDEAS
Robert Hills Story

Robert Hills Story

Robert Hills Story, In 1994, I was a fit, healthy 23-year-old, an amateur runner, an athlete. Until that time, I had never really been sick. I didn’t even have a regular doctor. When the illness started, it progressed rapidly. Daily diarrhea. Sustained stomach cramps. I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. It got worse my weight plummeted from 185 to 105 pounds. After a year and a half, it became clear that my large intestine needed to be removed.

Not long after surgery, I started getting active again, running and eventually competing. In the lowest moment of the Crohn’s flare-up, I was not been able to climb the stairs in our house so regaining my fitness became a very personal challenge. Recovering mentally would take longer.

When I was ill, learned an aunt also had Crohn’s, a fact she had never shared, even with close family members. Through her experience and my own, I realized how destructive the stigma surrounding intestinal diseases and having an ostomy can be. How it can isolate you, keep you from reaching out and getting help.

I decided to do something about it.

The Seven Summits campaign, which we call “No Guts Know Glory” grew from my love of sports, adventure and the outdoors. By taking it to the extreme, and on a global basis, hoping to show people everywhere that having these diseases or having an ostomy, like I do, shouldn’t stop you from leading a full life. You may not be able to climb mountains, but there are so many other things you can do.

To further this goal, I started the Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS), from home in Vancouver, British Columbia.

I approached ConvaTec, whose ostomy products I wear, to sponsor climbs, and became a member of the Great Comebacks™ family. This global program has allowed me to be a guest speaker in many countries, alongside climbs and through local patient and professional organizations.

While reaching the top of each mountain is a great accomplishment, with respect, removing the social stigma associated with these diseases and having an ostomy is a far more daunting task. A task which will require much more than his voice on its own, so Rob hopes you add yours in letting people know they are not alone. One of the young people I recently met said, “this isn’t really about climbing mountains, it’s about moving them.”

My final 7 Summits climb in the spring of 2010–up the south route to the top of Mount Everest in Nepal–thanks to the generous support of Abbott Laboratories and ConvaTec.

Robert Hills Story If you’d like to contact Rob directly, please send an e-mail to rob @ nogutsknowglory.com

 
Crohns Disease Affects Brain Function

Crohns Disease Affects Brain Function

Crohns Disease Affects Brain Function, A new research has found that Crohn’s disease not only affects the gut but also has an impact on the brain. Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by inflammation of the digestive, or gastrointestinal, tract.

The research published in the UEG Journal on Wednesday shows that those with Crohns disease experience slower response times compared with individuals who do not have the disease. The cognitive response times were 10 percent slower than normal and significantly corresponded with symptoms of active inflammation, including abdominal pain and fatigue, the study finds. The results show the presence of a mild cognitive impairment in Crohn’s patients. This also supports frequent complaints from patients related to lack of concentration, clouding of thought and memory lapses. The study also found that Crohn’s patients had a higher median depression score and a poorer rate of sleep quality.

“These results reinforce the notion that Crohn’s has a wide range of multi-systemic consequences with the impact of the disease affecting patients not only within but well beyond the digestive tract,” Dr. Daniel van Langenberg, the lead researcher of the study, said in a statement. “The findings appear consistent with experiments that have shown that bowel inflammation results in an upregulation of inflammatory hippocampus activity in the brain. This, in turn, might account for the slower response times that were observed in the study.”

Crohn’s disease, which is one of the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease, can cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, and fatigue. There is no cure for Crohn’s disease but medications such as steroids and immunosuppressants can be used to slow the progression of the disease.

Commenting on the research, Gigi Veereman, UEG inflammatory bowel disease expert, said: “This research highlights the need for regular interventions with multi-disciplinary IBD teams to address the wide issues that are presented with Crohn’s disease. This will enable a greater understanding of this complex condition and therefore improve the service and care offered to each patient.”

Read More: Crohn’s Disease Symptoms Update: Inflammatory Bowel Disease Affects Brain Function

 
Takeda says Ka Pow IBD

Takeda says Ka Pow IBD

Takeda worked with the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America and Marvel Custom Solutions to create its first-ever pharma company-sponsored superhero to shine a light on the many sufferers of IBD who hide their disease. The disease awareness campaign includes the graphic illustration series with IBD-suffering hero Samarium, as well as digital paid ads and social media shares.

Stephanie Brown, VP of Takeda’s specialty business unit in the U.S., said in a statement that “our hope is that patients will feel inspired to have the raw and real conversations they need to have with healthcare professionals, family, and friends, to increase awareness, understanding, and to strive for the best care for their IBD.”

The first-in-the-series online comic, out now, will be made into actual comic books and distributed at some events, including several Comic-Con festivals that Takeda will attend, a Takeda spokeswoman told FiercePharmaMarketing. She said more stories are planned for the graphic illustration series, including global editions. And for every view of the online graphic at IBDUnmasked.com, Takeda will donate $1 to CCFA, up to $25,000.

Takeda markets IBD biologic Entyvio, although that brand is not mentioned in this disease awareness campaign. Entyvio, which did launch a branded ad campaign earlier this year, faces competition in a crowded IBD space where it’s up against established Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis brands such as AbbVie’s Humira, Amgen’s Enbrel, and Johnson & Johnson’s Remicade and follow-up Simponi.

Takeda marketers were introduced to Marvel through a mutual agency partner. The ideas for the graphic were then generated in an all-day brainstorming session that included Takeda and CCFA representatives, along with patients who have Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

The initial response has been “incredibly positive” from patients, the spokeswoman said, pointing out that “even when you work in a heavily regulated environment, you can still be creative and create something interesting and compelling enough for people to want to share it.”

Takeda’s press release